How Not to Destroy the Internet while Fighting Terror

 

Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon, blogger and co-founder of Global Voices Online, will be speaking at VOX-Pol’s two day Workshop on the Role of Social Media and Internet Companies in Responding to Violent Online Political Extremism starting tomorrow at the Center for Media, Data and Society at Central European University in Budapest. Next week’s blog post will supply a synopsis of discussions at the workshop.

by Rebecca MacKinnon

In response to the tragic massacre in Paris, the French government has called for UN member states to work together on an international legal framework that would place greater responsibility on social networks and other Internet platforms for terrorist use of their services. In addressing the problem of terrorist use of social networking platforms, it is important to adhere to the following principles:

First, multi-stakeholder policymaking. The international human rights community opposes UN control over Internet governance because many UN member states advocate policies that would make the Internet much less free and open. The alternative is a multi-stakeholder approach that includes industry, civil society, and the technical community alongside governments in setting policies and technical standards that ensure that the Internet functions globally. In constructing global responses to terrorist use of the Internet we need a multi-stakeholder approach for the same reasons.

Second, any national level laws, regulations, or policies aimed at regulating or policing online activities should undergo a human rights risk assessment process to identify potential negative repercussions for freedom of expression, assembly and privacy. Governments need to be transparent with the public about the nature and volume of requests being made to companies. Companies need to be able to uphold core principles of freedom of expression and privacy, grounded in international human rights standards. Several major US-based Internet companies have made commitments to uphold these rights as members of the multi-stakeholder Global Network Initiative. Guidelines for implementing these commitments include: narrowly interpreting government demands to restrict content or grant access to user data or communications; challenging government requests that lack a clear user basis; transparency with users about the types of government requests received and the extent to which the company complies; restricting compliance to the online domains over which the requesting government actually has jurisdiction.

Third, liability for Internet intermediaries including social networks for users’ behavior must be kept limited. Research conducted around the world by human rights experts and legal scholars shows clear evidence that when companies are held liable for users’ speech and activity, violations of free expression and privacy can be expected to occur. Limited liability for Internet companies is an important prerequisite for keeping the Internet open and free.

Fourth, development and enforcement of companies’ Terms of Service and other forms of private policing must also undergo human rights risk assessments. Any new procedures developed by companies to eliminate terrorist activity from their platforms must be accompanied by engagement with key affected stakeholders and at-risk groups.

Fifth, in order to prevent abuse and maintain public support for the measures taken, governments as well as companies must provide effective, accessible channels for grievance and remedy for people whose rights to free expression, assembly, and privacy have been violated.

The above recommendations were informed by years of work on Internet free expression and privacy issues, the Global Network Initiative‘s principles and implementation guidelines, standards for ICT sector companies currently under development by the Ranking Digital Rights project, and a new report published by UNESCO titled Fostering Freedom Online: The Role of Internet Intermediaries.

 


The above post was first published on Ranking Digital Rights, of which MacKinnon is the Director, on 28 January, the day after MacKinnon testified at a hearing titled The Evolution of Terrorist Propaganda: The Paris Attack and Social Media convened by the House Foreign Affairs Committee’s Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade. A copy of her written testimony, along with testimony of all other speakers can be downloaded here. Video of the hearing is here. The above post is a distillation of her main arguments.